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Nov 09

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Doi Inthanon National Park covers the areas of Sanpatong District, Chomthong District, Mae Chaem District, Mae Wang District, and Toi Lor Sub-district of Chiang Mai Province within an approximate area of 482 square kilometers or 301,500 rai. The National Park consists of high mountains, including Doi Inthanon, which is the highest mountaintop in Thailand and the source of many rivers such as Ping River, where the Bhumipol Dam is situated and generating the electrical power. The National Park has beautiful natural scenery such as waterfalls, particularly Mae Ya Waterfall, which is one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Thailand.

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Topography

The geographical features of the National Park consists of high mountains, including Doi Inthanon, which is the highest mountaintop in Thailand (2,565 meters above the sea level), followed by Doi Huamodluang (2,330 meters above the sea level). Doi Inthanon is the source of many rivers including Mae Klang, Mae Pakong, Mae Pon, Mae Hoi, Mae Ya, Mae Chaem, Mae Khan, and being part of Ping River, where the Bhumipol Dam is situated and generating the electrical power.

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Climate

Since the National Park is located at 2,565 meters above the sea level, it has cold weather and high humidity throughout the year, particularly on the top of the National Park. In winter, the temperature at the National Park is below 0„ac. And in summer, despite hot weather in central Chiang Mai and nearby districts, it is still freezing on the top of Doi Inthanon and tourists should be prepared with thick clothes.

Flora and Fauna

In general, the National Park contains alternate areas of vast lands and forests since tribesmen opened up wasteland for cultivation. (It can be seen from both sides to the top of Doi Inthanon that the mountains are all reclaimed unlike other national parks).

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Doi Inthanon National Park has varieties of forests, including virgin forests, pinery, timber forests, and mixed forests. Economic plants available in the National Park include teak, Malabar Ironwood, pine, timber, Dipterocarpus Intricatus (Hiang), ebony, Xylia Xylocarpa (redwood plants), Leguminosae (Pradoo), Terminalia Arjuna (Rokfa), Afzelia Bijuga (Maka), Black Wood, Michelia Alba, Lagerstroemia (Tabaek), etc. Moreover, there are varieties of beautiful wild flowers such as Fah-mui, Chang Daeng, Rongtao Naree (wild orchids), and wild roses. Meanwhile, moss, Kao Tok Ruesi, and Osmunda can be found everywhere.

The number of wild animals in the National Park is decreasing since tribesmen hunt them and forests are reclaimed for dwellings, as a result, some species of large animals become extinct. At present, some surviving animals include goral, deer, tigers, wild boars, bears, wild rabbits, and wild fowls.

Source: National Park Wild life and Plant Conservation Department

For information: 053 275525, 053 208988

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